Arts & Science Calendar 1998-99: Table of Contents: Programs and Courses
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CHM CHEMISTRY


On this page: Introduction | Faculty Members | Programs | Courses
See also: Course Summer Timetable | Course Winter Timetable | Secondary School Information | More on Department

Introduction

Chemistry is a challenging intellectual pursuit and a dominant force in shaping our civilization. Chemistry places strong emphasis on an understanding of the structures and properties of individual atoms and molecules, and on using this understanding to interpret and predict the behaviour of matter. Many of the concepts of physics, and the methods of mathematics, are basic to chemistry. Chemistry is of fundamental importance to many other subjects including astrophysics, biological sciences, environmental science, geology, materials science, and medical sciences. These and other aspects of the subject are reflected in the courses offered, and the programs recommended by the Department.

The Department has made extensive changes to its course and program offerings in the last few years. These changes included a revision of first year courses, substantial modifications to later-year courses, the introduction of new specialist programs in Biological Chemistry, Materials Chemistry, and in Environmental Chemistry, and more flexibility for students choosing areas of specialization both within chemistry and in combination with other disciplines.

Students can choose one of two first year courses.

CHM 151Y is the course strongly recommended for all students who will be following one of the specialist programs involving chemistry or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their eventual programs of study.

CHM 137Y is the course recommended for students who intend to take programs in the Life or Health Sciences which do not require a large amount of chemistry. It is also the most appropriate course for students applying for entry into professional programs.

For students who experience academic difficulties in the first term of CHM 137Y/151Y, the Department offers the opportunity to withdraw from CHM 137Y/151Y and to start again in the sequence CHM 132H, 133H. Further details of this are contained in the course descriptions which follow.

The outlines of these first year courses, together with those for later-year offerings, are shown in this calendar. More detailed information is available from the Department and is printed in the Department of Chemistry's Undergraduate Handbook as well as being available on the World Wide Web at http://www.chem.utoronto.ca. Students who are following programs that contain a substantial number of chemistry courses are strongly advised to take courses in the proper year (i.e. 200-series in second year, etc.). The level and balance of preparation for all later year courses will be enhanced by following this sequence, and some irreconcilable timetable conflicts will be avoided.

Students whose current programs may be affected by the introduction of new or revised chemistry courses are advised to consult the Department at the earliest possible opportunity.

The Professional Experience Year program ("PEY": see alsoStudy Elsewhere Program Options) is available to eligible students after their second year of study. The PEY program is an optional 16 month work term providing industrial experience; its length often allows students to have the rewarding experience of initiating and completing a major project.

Students requiring more information about Chemistry programs and courses are invited to visit or phone the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies, Lash Miller Chemical Laboratories, Room 151 (978-6033).

Faculty Members

University Professor Emeritus
A.G. Brook, BA, Ph D, FRSC

Professors Emeriti
M. Bersohn, BS, Ph D S.C. Nyburg, B Sc, Ph D, D Sc
G. Burns, B Sc, Ph D A.J. PoŽ, B Sc, MA, Ph D, D Sc, DIC, Sc D (E)
J.M. Deckers, L Sc, DRSC (E) W.F. Reynolds, M Sc, Ph D
J.E. Guillet, BA, Ph D, Sc D, FRSC E.A. Robinson, B Sc, Ph D, D Sc (E)
A.G. Harrison, M Sc, Ph D G.H. Schmid, B Sc, Ph D
A.J. Kresge, BA, Ph D, FRSC (S) J.P. Valleau, MA, Ph D (I)
M.W. Lister, BA, D Phil K. Yates, M Sc, Ph D, D Phil, FRSC (U)
S. McLean, B Sc, Ph D

Professor and Acting Chair of the Department
M. Moskovits, B Sc, Ph D

Professor
and Associate Chair (Graduate)
R.H. Kluger, AM, Ph D

Associate Professor and Associate Chair
(Undergraduate)
D.H. Farrar, M Sc, Ph D

University Professors
P.W. Brumer, B Sc, Ph D, FRSC J.C. Polanyi, M Sc, Ph D, D Sc, FRS, FRSC
J.B. Jones, B Sc, Ph D, D Phil, FRSC

Professors
I.G. Csizmadia, Dip Eng, M Sc, Ph D J. Powell, B Sc, Ph D
R.E. Kapral, B Sc, Ph D, FRSC I.W.J. Still, B Sc, Ph D, D Sc (E)
U.J. Krull, B Sc, Ph D (E) J.C. Thompson, BA, Ph D (S)
M. Lautens, B Sc, Ph D (T) M. Thompson, B Sc, Ph D, D Sc
P.M. Macdonald, M Sc, Ph D (E) T.T. Tidwell, B Sc, AM, Ph D (S)
I. Manners, B Sc, Ph D J.C. Van Loon, B Sc, Ph D
R.A. McClelland, B Sc, Ph D, FRSC (S) A. Walker, B Sc, Ph D (S)
M. Menzinger, Dip Eng, M Sc, Ph D (SM) S.C. Wallace, B Sc, Ph D
R.J.D. Miller, B S, Ph D S.G. Whittington, MA, Ph D (T)
R.H. Morris, B Sc, Ph D M.A. Winnik, BA, Ph D, FRSC
G.A. Ozin, B Sc, D Phil, FRSC

Associate Professors
D.J. Donaldson, B Sc, Ph D (S) M.C. Goh, BS, Ph D (U)
S.J. Fraser, BA, Ph D (S) J.K. Reed, M Sc, Ph D (E)

Assistant Professors
R.A. Batey, BA, Ph D J. Schofield, BA, Ph D
M. Denk, Diplom, Ph D S.D. Taylor, B Sc, Ph D (E)
E. Kumacheva, M Sc, Ph D G.A. Woolley, B Sc, Ph D
S.A. Mabury, BS, Ph D A. Yudin, BS, Ph D
A.M. MacMillan, AM, Ph D

Senior Tutors
R.A. Cox, B Sc, Ph D S. Skonieczny, D Sc, Ph D
C.M. Kutas, B Sc A. Tanin, B Sc, Ph D
H.O. Ohorodnyk, M Sc J.M.C. Yuen, M Sc
J.C. PoŽ, ARCS, M Sc, DIC (E)

Tutors
D. McIntosh, B Sc, Ph D M. Morgan, B Sc

CHEMISTRY PROGRAMS

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY (Hon.B.Sc.)

Consult Professors A. Woolley, Department of Chemistry.

Enrolment in this program requires completion of four courses; no minimum GPA required. Specialist program: S19951 (13 full courses or their equivalent, including at least two 400-series courses)
First Year: BIO 150Y; CHM 151Y/137Y/(132H, 133H); MAT 135Y/137Y; PHY 110Y/138Y/140Y

Second and Higher Years:
1. BIO 250Y; CHM 222Y/225Y/(229H,327Y), 238Y, 248Y, 347H, 348H, 379H
2. 3.5 300/400-series courses in BCH or CHM, including CHM 437H, 447H, and two other 400-level CHM half courses

NOTE: Students may qualify for Chemistry Major after 3 years

CHEMICAL PHYSICS (Hon.B.Sc.)

Consult Professor S.C. Wallace, Department of Chemistry, and Professor H. van Driel, Department of Physics.

Enrolment in this program requires completion of four courses; no minimum GPA required.

Specialist program: S06001 (14 full courses or their equivalent, including at least 1.5 400-series courses)
First Year: CHM 151Y/137Y/(132H, 133H), MAT 137Y; PHY 140Y
Higher Years:
1. APM 346H; CHM (225Y, 326H/328H)/(229H, 327Y); MAT 223H/240H, 235Y, 244H, 334H; PHY 251H, 255H, 351H, 352H; CHM 423H/PHY (355H, 457H)
2. Two full course equivalents from CHM 217H, 238Y, 248Y, 314Y, 338H, 348H
3. Four 400-series half-courses in CHM/PHY

NOTE: Students may qualify for Chemistry Major after 3 years
3. JIE 410H; CHM 418Y/428Y/439Y*/449Y (ENV 421H and an additional half course from 300/400-series CHM or another approved option) *CHM 439Y has the prerequisite CHM 438H

Minor program Minor program: Division of the Environment

CHEMISTRY (B.Sc.)

Consult Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies, Department of Chemistry.

Enrolment in the Specialist, Major and Minor Chemistry programs requires completion of four courses; no minimum GPA required.

Specialist program (Hon.B.Sc.): S13761 (13 full courses or their equivalent, including at least three 400-series courses)
First Year: CHM 151Y/137Y/(132H, 133H); MAT 135Y/137Y; PHY 138Y/140Y
Second Year: CHM 217H, 225Y/229H, 238Y, 248Y; MAT 235Y
Third and Fourth Years:
1. CHM (326H/328H)/327Y
2. Five 300/400-level full course equivalents in CHM/MAT/another science, including at least two of CHM 314Y, 326H, 328H, 338H, 346H/348H, 379H and at least three 400-level CHM full course equivalents

Major program Major program: M13761 (8 full courses or their equivalent)
First Year: CHM 151Y/137Y/(132H, 133H); MAT 135Y/137Y
Second Year: At least two of CHM 217H, 222Y/225Y/229H, 238Y, 240Y/248Y
Third Year: At least two of CHM 314Y, 326H/327Y/328H, 338H, 346H/348H, 379H

Fourth Year: Further 200/300/400-level CHM courses to make a total of seven CHM full course equivalents (CHM 200Y, 299Y excluded)

Minor program Minor program: R13761 (4 full courses or their equivalent)
First Year: CHM 151Y/137Y/(132H, 133H)
Second Year: At least one of CHM 217H, 223Y/225Y/229H, 238Y, 240Y/248Y
Third Year: At least one of CHM 314Y, 326H/327Y/328H, 338H, 346H/348H, 379H
Fourth Year: Further 200/300/400-level CHM courses to make a total of four CHM full course equivalents (CHM 200Y excluded)

CHEMISTRY AND GEOLOGY (Hon.B.Sc.)

Consult Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies, Department of Chemistry, and Professor G.S. Henderson, Department of Geology.

Enrolment in this program requires completion of four courses; no minimum GPA required.

Specialist program: S50791 (12 full courses or their equivalent, including at least one 400-series course)
First Year: CHM 151Y/137Y/(132H, 133H); MAT 135Y/137Y; PHY 138Y/140Y*
Second Year: CHM 217H, 238Y; GLG 206H, 207H, 216H/217H
Third and Fourth Years:
1. CHM 225Y/(229H, 327Y), 248Y, 338H, 314Y/346H/348H
2. Two 400-series half-courses in CHM; GLG 318H, 319H, 340H
3. Three 300+series half-courses in GLG

NOTE: Students may qualify for Chemistry Major after 3 years *JGF 150Y/GLG 110H is recommended but not required in the program.

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (Hon.B.Sc.)

Consult Professor S.A. Mabury, Department of Chemistry

Enrolment in this program is limited. It requires prior completion of 4 courses with a minimum GPA of 2.3. Three courses must be from the First Year list. Apply through the Division of the Environment by 23 May, Room 2097, Earth Sciences Centre or at http://www.utoronto.ca/dienv/ballot/

Specialist program: S25431 (15 full courses or their equivalent, including at least one 400-series courses)
First Year: BIO 150Y; CHM 137Y/151Y/(132H, 133H); MAT 135Y/137Y; PHY 138Y/140Y
Second Year: CHM 217H, 222Y/225Y, 240/248Y; ENV 221Y, 235Y
Third and Fourth Years:
1. CHM 238Y, 310H, 410H; ENV 234Y, 321Y
2. One additional FCE from 300/400-series CHM courses

MATERIALS CHEMISTRY PROGRAM

— See MATERIALS SCIENCE

CHEMISTRY COURSES

(see Section 4 for Key to Course Descriptions)

For Distribution Requirement purposes, all CHM courses are classified as SCIENCE courses. SCI199Y
First Year Seminar 52T

Undergraduate seminar that focuses on specific ideas, questions, phenomena or controversies, taught by a regular Faculty member deeply engaged in the discipline. Open only to newly admitted first year students. It may serve as a breadth requirement course; see First Year Seminars: 199Y.

NOTE First Year Chemistry Laboratory

Taken by all students in CHM 137Y and 151Y in alternate weeks. Wherever possible, the experimental work complements material discussed in lectures. The general emphasis is on the development of laboratory skills and techniques. Students taking Chemistry and Physics may schedule these labs on the same afternoon of alternate weeks.

CHM132H
General Chemistry I 39L, 13T

Repeat of the first term of CHM 137Y. Offered only in the 2nd term of the Winter Session. Students in academic difficulty in CHM 137Y/151Y may, with the permission of the Department, withdraw from CHM 137Y/151Y and enrol in CHM 132H in the spring term. Students eligible for this option will be informed by the beginning of the spring term. Students not enrolled in CHM 137Y/151Y in the immediately preceding fall term are not permitted to enrol in CHM 132H. CHM 132H together with CHM 133H is equivalent to CHM 137Y for program and prerequisite purposes.

Note: Students who enrol in CHM 137Y/151Y after completing CHM 132H will not receive degree credit for CHM 137Y/151Y; CHM 137Y/151Y will be counted only as an "extra course."
Exclusion: CHM137Y, 151Y
Prerequisite: Permission of Department, registration in CHM137Y/151Y in the immediately preceding fall term. See CHM137Y below for details.
Co-requisite: MAT135Y/137Y, PHY110Y/138Y/140Y are recommended. Some higher level CHM courses have 1st year MAT/PHY prerequisites

CHM133H
General Chemistry II 39L, 24P, 13T

The second term of CHM 137Y. Offered only in the Summer Day Session. Students not enroled in CHM 132H in the immediately preceding Winter Session are not allowed to enrol in CHM 133H. CHM 132H together with CHM 133H is equivalent to CHM 137Y for program and prerequisite purposes.
Exclusion: CHM137Y, 151Y
Prerequisite: Permission of Department, CHM132H
Co-requisite: MAT135Y/137Y, PHY110Y/138Y/140Y are recommended. Some higher level CHM courses have 1st year MAT/PHY prerequisites

CHM137Y
General Chemistry 78L, 24P, 26T

This course is recommended for students in life and health science programs. Chemical bonding; structures of molecules; aspects of thermodynamics and reaction dynamics. (See note on Laboratory above)

Note: At the end of first term of the Winter Session, students in CHM 137Y may: a) continue in CHM 137Y; or b) transfer to CHM 132H, with the permission of the Department, if their first term mark falls in the range 35-50%.
Exclusion: CHM151Y
Prerequisite: High school science background, preferably OAC Chemistry and Mathematics (Calc/A&G/both). Students without OAC Chemistry but with at least one of OAC Mathematics (Calc/A&G)/Physics may enrol but are advised to consult the Department
Co-requisite: MAT135Y/137Y, PHY110Y/138Y/140Y are recommended. Some higher level CHM courses have first year MAT/PHY prerequisites.

CHM151Y
Chemistry: The Molecular Science 78L, 31P, 26T

Strongly recommended for students interested in following specialist or major programs in Chemistry, and/or whose fields of study include a substantial amount of chemistry. The lecture course and lab provide an introduction to some of the exciting current areas of chemistry. Topics include: lasers and spectroscopy, organic molecules, biological and synthetic polymers, and materials with novel properties such as superconductors. (See note on Laboratory above)

Note: At the end of first term, students in CHM 151Y may: a) continue in CHM 151Y; or b) transfer to CHM 132H, with the permission of the Department, if their first term mark falls in the range 35-50%.
Exclusion: CHM137Y
Prerequisite: OAC Chemistry + OAC Mathematics (Calc, A&G); OAC Physics recommended
Co-requisite: MAT135Y/137Y; PHY110Y/138Y/140Y

CHM200Y
The Role of Chemistry in Modern Society 52L

Human beings are constructed physically of chemicals, live in a sea of chemicals and are very dependent for their material quality of life on the modern chemical industry. This course is especially for non-science students who wish to develop a better understanding of the impact and importance of chemistry in industry, society and the environment. The course should be of particular interest to students with interests in economics, commerce, management, politics, psychology and teaching.
Exclusion: SCI199Y "Chemistry in Action." Students who have taken one or more university-level courses in chemistry require permission of the instructor.
Prerequisite: completion of any 4 courses

CHM217H
Introduction to Analytical Chemistry 26L, 52P, 13T

Introduction to classical and instrumental analytical chemistry. Scope of analytical chemistry: statistical methods; signal response, sensitivity and limit-of-detection of various techniques. Solution equilibrium applications: gravimetry, titrimetry, acid-base, redox and complexometric processes. Absorption spectroscopy: Beer's Law.
Prerequisite: CHM137Y/(132H, 133H)/151Y

CHM222Y
Physical Chemistry for Life Sciences 52L, 26T

Energy principles governing chemical and biochemical processes; reaction rates and mechanisms; photochemistry; spectroscopy. Examples to illustrate fundamental principles are taken, as far as possible, from the life sciences. This course is specially designed to meet the needs of students in the life sciences; its emphasis is on biological systems. Note that CHM225Y is the recommended course for the Biological Chemistry, Chemistry, Chemical Physics, and Chemistry and Geology Specialist Programs.
Exclusion: CHM223Y, 225Y, 229H
Prerequisite: CHM137Y/(132H, 133H)/151Y, MAT135Y/137Y

CHM225Y
Introduction to Physical Chemistry 52L, 26T

This course, which is directed to students in the Chemistry major and specialist programs, parallels CHM 222Y with a greater emphasis on mathematical and problem solving aspects. Topics: introductory thermodynamics, first and second law and applications; non-ideal gases, chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry, surface chemistry; chemical kinetics; introductory quantum mechanics; spectroscopy, and molecular photophysics.
Exclusion: CHM222Y/223Y
Prerequisite: CHM137Y/(132H, 133H)/151Y, MAT135Y/137Y, PHY110Y/138Y/140Y
Co-requisite: MAT235Y

ENV235Y
Physics and Chemistry of Planet Earth (see "ENV: Division of the Environment")

CHM238Y
Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry 52L, 52P

The first part (with CHM338H) of a two-year sequence in Inorganic Chemistry, designed to illustrate and systematize the rich variety of structures, physical properties and reactions of compounds of the elements across and down the Periodic Table. Structure, symmetry and bonding of molecules and lattices; acid-base and redox reactions; d-metal complexes; systematic chemistry of metals and elements of the s and p blocks. The laboratory runs weekly from January to April.
Prerequisite: CHM151Y/137Y/(132H, 133H)

CHM240Y
Introductory Organic Chemistry 52L, 52P

The fundamentals of organic chemistry: structures and reactions of organic compounds. Principles of mechanism, synthesis, and spectroscopy. The laboratory includes work on separation, purification, synthesis, and the identification of compounds.
Exclusion: CHM151Y, 248Y
Prerequisite: CHM(132H, 133H)/137Y

CHM248Y
Organic Chemistry I 52L, 52P

An in-depth survey of organic molecules and principles of their reactions. Emphasis is on understanding the basics with respect to structure and bonding, and application of reactions to the synthesis of medicinally and industrially important compounds. Continues from CHM 151Y.
Exclusion: CHM240Y
Prerequisite: CHM151Y/(137Y/(132H, 133H) with permission)

CHM299Y
Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. See Research Opportunity Program for details.

CHM310H
Environmental Chemistry 26L

Major chemical pollutants and their sources, the environmental reactions they undergo, and how they become distributed throughout the environment. Focus is on the principal routes of chemical and biological degradation of toxicants; oxidation, photodegradation, hydrolysis, reduction, biotic metabolism, and microbial degradation. The principal physical processes by which chemicals move, concentrate, and dissipate.
Prerequisite: CHM240Y/248Y

CHM314Y
Introduction to Instrumental Methods of Analysis 52L, 52P

Scope of instrumental analytical chemistry; Fourier transform IR absorption spectroscopy; molecular luminescence; X-ray fluorescence; emission spectroscopy; photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy; mass spectroscopy, electrochemical techniques; sensors; gas and high performance liquid chromatography; capillary zone electrophoresis; instrument design principles and applications in industry, and the environment.
Prerequisite: CHM217H
Recommended preparation: CHM222Y/225Y

CHM325H
Materials Chemistry 26L

This course is designed to illustrate how chemistry can be rationally used to design useful materials by influencing properties. Materials: metals, ceramics, and polymers. Structure property relations. Solid state materials: synthesis, properties, and applications. Solid state devices. Polymeric materials and their applications. Elastomers, thermoplastics, and thermosets. Electrically conducting and liquid crystalline polymers.
Prerequisite: CHM222Y/225Y/229H, 238Y, 240Y/248Y

CHM326H
Introductory Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy 26L, 26P

This course introduces the postulates of quantum mechanics to develop the fundamental framework of quantum theory. A number of exactly soluble problems are treated in detail as examples. Perturbation theory is introduced in the context of understanding many body problems. Various applications to molecular spectroscopy and dynamics are covered in detail.
Prerequisite: CHM225Y (or CHM222Y/223Y/229H with permission of instructor), MAT235Y

CHM328H
Modern Physical Chemistry 26L, 26P

In this continuation of CHM 225Y, more advanced topics in thermodynamics such as non-ideal effects are introduced. Statistical mechanics and its application to chemical problems are introduced. Reaction dynamics are analyzed from a fundamental perspective.
Prerequisite: CHM225Y (or CHM222Y/223Y/229H with permission of instructor), MAT235Y

CHM338H
Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 26L, 52P

Further study of the structures, physical properties and reactions of compounds of the elements with emphasis on the transition metals. Introductions to spectroscopy and structural analysis, reaction mechanisms, d- and f-block organometallic compounds, catalysis, structures of solids and bioinorganic chemistry. The weekly laboratory demonstrates aspects of transition metal chemistry.
Exclusion: CHM339H
Prerequisite: CHM238Y
Recommended Preparation: CHM217H, 240Y/248Y

CHM346H
Modern Organic Synthesis 26L, 52P

An overview of the preparation of various classes of organic compounds. Strategies and tactics of synthetic organic chemistry, using examples from natural product and drug syntheses. C-C bond formation, functional group reactivity, structure, stereochemistry and selectivity.
Prerequisite: CHM240Y/248Y

CHM347H
Organic Chemistry of Biological Compounds 26L

Structure, reactions, and preparation of metabolically important compounds based on modern concepts of organic chemistry. Advanced stereochemistry, carbohydrate structure and reactivity, amino acid and peptide synthesis, reactions of nitrogen heterocycles, synthesis and analysis of nucleotide and phosphate esters, synthesis of drugs.
Prerequisite: CHM240Y/248Y

CHM348H
Organic Reaction Mechanisms 26L, 26P

Analysis of structure and reactions of organic molecules in terms of physical principles. Mechanistic principles of important classes of organic reactions.
Exclusion: CHM349H
Prerequisite: CHM240Y/248H

CHM379H
Biomolecular Chemistry 26L, 24P

Biological macromolecules; structure, function and catalysis in the context of biological phenomena. This course extends principles learned in earlier chemistry courses to the understanding of important biochemical phenomena.
Prerequisite: CHM240Y/248Y, 347H
Recommended preparation: CHM 348H

CHM410H
Analytical Environmental Chemistry 26L, 24P, 12T

An analytical theory, instrumental, and methodology course focused on the measurement of pollutants in soil, water, air, and biological tissues and the determination of physical/chemical properties including vapour pressure, degradation rates, partitioning. Lab experiments involve application of theory.
Prerequisite: CHM310H
Recommended preparation: CHM314Y

CHM414H
Developing Techniques in Analytical Chemistry 26L

Current research in analytical chemistry with emphasis on rapidly emerging techniques. Course topics chosen from biosensor technology, transducer theory and operation, device design and fabrication, surface modification and methods of surface analysis, flow injection analysis and chemometrics.

Recommended preparation: CHM314Y

CHM416H
Separation Science 26L

Principles of separation in analytical chemistry. Fractionation processes and solvent extractions; theory of chromatography, retention time, column efficiency and resolution. Principles of gas-liquid chromatography; instrumentation for gas chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography - practice and equipment design. Ion exchange, size-exclusion and affinity chromatography. Electrophoretic techniques.
Prerequisite: CHM314Y

CHM418Y
Introduction to Research in Analytical Chemistry 260P

An experimental or theoretical research problem under the supervision of a member of staff. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding spring.
Exclusion: CHM428Y/439Y/449Y
Prerequisite: Permission of Department

Recommended preparation: CHM314Y/319H

CHM421H
Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics 26L

Reaction mechanisms; collision dynamics; theory of the rates of elementary processes; introduction to complex reactions including nonlinear processes.
Prerequisite: CHM327Y/(326H, 328H), 427H

CHM423H
Applications of Quantum Mechanics 26L

This course is based on the material of CHM229H. It starts with a discussion of the basic principles of quantum mechanics and moves on to treat some exactly solvable problems including harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom. The approximation methods such as perturbation theory and variational method are considered along with their applications. The problem of angular momentum and its role in chemical bonding, atomic and molecular electronic structure is discussed.
Prerequisite: CHM327Y/(326H, 328H)

CHM426H
Polymer Chemistry 26L

Scope of polymer chemistry. Organic and inorganic polymers. Synthesis and characterization of polymers. Polymers as advanced materials. Polymers in solution: Flory-Huggins theory. Polymers in the solid state: crystalline and amorphous polymers, the effects of the glass transition on polymer properties.
Prerequisite: CHM325H; two of CHM217H, 338H, 348H or permission of the instructor

CHM427H
Statistical Mechanics 26L

Ensemble theory in statistical mechanics. Applications, including imperfect gases and liquid theories. Introduction to non-equilibrium problems.
Prerequisite: CHM327Y/(326H, 328H)

CHM428Y
Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry 260P

An experimental or theoretical research problem under the supervision of a member of the Physical Chemistry staff. Enrolment in this course may be restricted and must be approved by the Department. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding spring.
Exclusion: CHM418Y/439Y/449Y
Prerequisite: CHM326H/327Y/328H and permission of Department

CHM432H
Organometallic Chemistry 26L

Structure, bonding, and reactions of organometallic compounds, with emphasis on basic mechanisms, and industrial processes. Addition, metalation, substitution, elimination, important catalytic cycles, electrophilic, and nucleophilic reactions are considered on a mechanistic basis. Properties of s and p block organometallics.
Prerequisite: CHM338H
Recommended preparation: CHM348H/349H

CHM434H
Solid State Chemistry 26L

Introduction to solid state chemistry and its relevance to modern technology. Preparative methods and applications of physical techniques to the characterisation of inorganic solids. Ionic conductivity, solid electrolytes; electronic properties and the band theory of metals, semiconductors and inorganic solids; electrical, optical, magnetic, catalytic properties; glasses and ceramics. Organic solid state chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHM338H

CHM437H
Bio-Inorganic Chemistry 26L

Essential elements in biology; naturally occurring and medicinal ligands; transport, uptake and control of concentration of metal ions; physical methods of characterization of metal binding sites. Roles of metal ions: as structural and signaling elements in proteins, nucleic acids and DNA-binding complexes and proteins; as Lewis-acid centres in enzymes; as carriers of electrons, atoms and groups in redox proteins and enzymes; as sources of biominerals; as radiopharmaceuticals.
Prerequisite: CHM238H

Recommended preparation: CHM 338H, CHM347H/379H

CHM438H
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 130P

A six-week intensive laboratory course during the first half of the First Term. Eleven set experiments designed to illustrate one or more facets of synthetic, spectroscopic and analytical studies in inorganic chemistry. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding Spring.
Prerequisite: CHM338H and permission of Department

CHM439Y
Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry 260P

An experimental or theoretical research problem under the supervision of a staff member. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding spring.
Exclusion: CHM418Y/428Y/449Y
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Co-requisite: CHM438H CHM440H
The Synthesis of Modern Pharmaceutical Agents 26L

Overview of classes of molecules currently used in treatment of diseases. Within each therapeutic area, representative drugs on the market are considered and their syntheses discussed. Reactions taught in previous courses and new reactions are used. Students also gain appreciation of the mode of action, discovery and development of drugs in the pharmaceutical industry today.
Prerequisite: CHM346H

CHM441H
Spectroscopic Analysis in Organic Chemistry 13L, 6P, 13T

Structure and stereochemistry determination using modern spectroscopic techniques. The main focus of the course is on NMR spectroscopy (1H and 13C). Other spectroscopy techniques are discussed briefly, including infra-red, X-ray and mass spectral methods. The approach taken emphasizes applications of these spectroscopic methods to organic problems.
Prerequisite: CHM346H/348H

CHM443H
Advanced Organic Reaction Mechanisms 26L

Classes of organic reactions and their stepwise pathways. Stereochemical consequences of mechanisms. Reactive intermediates, solvent and substituent effects and their basis.
Prerequisite: CHM222Y/225Y, 348H

CHM447H
Bio-organic Chemistry 26L

Applications of organic chemistry and physical organic chemistry to the study of biologically important processes. Kinetics and mechanisms of enzyme catalysis, chemistry of co-enzymes, stereochemistry of biological reactions, biosynthesis of important biological molecules.
Prerequisite: BCH321Y/(CHM379H, 347H)
Recommended preparation: CHM348H

CHM449Y
Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry 260P

An experimental research problem under the supervision of a faculty member. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding spring. Projects in the areas of synthetic, physical and bio-organic chemistry are offered.
Exclusion: CHM418Y/428Y/439Y
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Recommended preparation: CHM346H/348H/379H


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