Arts & Science Calendar 1998-99: Table of Contents: Programs and Courses
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PSY PSYCHOLOGY


On this page: Introduction | Faculty Members | Programs | Courses
See also: Course Summer Timetable | Course Winter Timetable | Secondary School Information | More on Department

Introduction

Psychology is that branch of science which focuses on the behaviour of human beings and animals, with particular emphasis on the individual rather than the group. Our courses span the various areas of psychology and introduce students to the methods used in psychological research. The basic tools of the research psychologist include experimentation in the laboratory and field, naturalistic observation, and the use of statistical methods in interpreting data.

Our faculty have highly diversified interests which are reflected in the number and variety of our undergraduate course offerings. These include courses in developmental psychology, social psychology, personality, abnormal psychology, animal behaviour, learning, cognitive psychology, perception, and physiological psychology. A more detailed description of the individual courses and the names and interests of the course instructors appear in the Undergraduate Psychology Handbook issued annually by our Department and obtainable from Room 4020, Sidney Smith Hall. We encourage students at all levels, and particularly those who are beginning a Major or Specialist program in Psychology, to consult the Undergraduate Psychology Handbook before selecting courses and to discuss their proposed programs with the Undergraduate Advisor, the Undergraduate Director, or a faculty member in the Department.

Courses in the various areas within Psychology and the numbering system associated with these courses follow a definite pattern: PSY XXX. The first digit represents the year, and the second digit represents the area in which the course belongs. Social Psychology, for example, is identified by "2." Therefore, PSY 220 at the second year, PSY 320, 321, 322, and 323 at the third year, and PSY 420 at the fourth year represent all the Social Psychology courses. Other areas within Psychology follow a similar pattern.

Some of our courses are under intense enrolment pressure. When the number of students applying to enrol in a course exceeds that which can be accommodated by the available staff and space, we do not admit all students. Students who intend to take a laboratory course or any PSY 4XX-series course must ballot in the Department during a specific balloting period specified by the Faculty of Arts and Science in the March Supplement to this Calendar. This period is approximately two months before the course selection period. Full information on enrolment limits and on the method by which we admit students to oversubscribed courses appears in the Undergraduate Psychology Handbook.

Undergraduate Director: Professor B.B. Schiff, Sidney Smith Hall

Undergraduate Advisor: I.S. Kirschner, Sidney Smith Hall, Room 4014 (978-3407)

General Enquiries: Sidney Smith Hall, Room 4020 (978-5201)

Faculty Members

University Professor Emeritus
E. Tulving, MA, Ph D, D Litt, FD, FRSC

Professors Emeriti
A.J. Arrowood, BA, Ph D B.B. Murdock, BA, Ph D
B. Forrin, MA, Ph D (S) A. Rapoport, SM, Ph D
R.O. Kroger, MA, Ph D (T) B.T. Wigdor, CM, Ph D, D Sc
M.W. Lawrence, MA, Ph D

Professor and Acting Chair of the Department
A.M. Wall, BA, Ph D

Professor
and Associate Chair (Undergraduate Studies)
B.B. Schiff, M Sc, Ph D

Professor
and Associate Chair (Graduate Studies)
J.L. Freedman, MA, Ph D

University Professor
F.I.M. Craik, B Sc, Ph D, FRSC

Professors
R.A. Abramovitch, MA, Ph D (E) L. Krames, MA, Ph D (E)
T.M. Alloway, MA, Ph D (E) A. Kukla, MA, C Phil, Ph D (S)
J.N. Bassili, BA, Ph D (S) R.S. Lockhart, MA, Ph D (N)
G.B. Biederman, B Sc, Ph D (S) C.M. MacLeod, BA, Ph D (S)
C.M. Corter, BA, Ph D (E) N.W. Milgram, MA, Ph D (S)
G.C. Cupchik, MA, Ph D (S) M. Moscovitch, MA, Ph D (E)
M. Daneman, MA, Ph D (E) N. Mrosovsky, BA, Ph D
K.K. Dion, BA, Ph D (S) T.L. Petit, MA, Ph D (S)
K.L. Dion, BA, Ph D P.L. Pliner, BS, Ph D (E)
A.S. Fleming, BS, Ph D (E) J. Polivy, MA, Ph D (E)
J.E. Foley, BA, Ph D (S) B.A. Schneider, BA, Ph D (E)
J.J. Furedy, MA, Ph D S.J. Shettleworth, MA, Ph D
J.E. Grusec, BA, Ph D M.C. Smith, BA, Ph D (S)
C.P. Herman, BA, Ph D I. Spence, MA, Ph D
G.E. Hinton, BA, Ph D S.E. Trehub, BA, Ph D (E)
J.A. Hogan, MA, Ph D F.J. Vaccarino, M Sc, Ph D
G.O. Ivy, BA, Ph D (S) G.C. Walters, BA, Ph D (W)
J.M. Kennedy, BA, Ph D (S) J.S. Yeomans, BA, Ph D (U)

Associate Professors
P.J. Bennett, BS, Ph D E.M. Reingold, MA, Ph D
K.R. Blankstein, MA, Ph D (E) M.A. Schmuckler, BA, Ph D (S)
C.D. Creelman, MA, Ph D A.B. Sekuler, BA, Ph D
G. Moraglia, M Sc, Ph D (E) M.L. Smith, M Sc, Ph D (E)
M.R. Ralph, BS, Ph D

Assistant Professors
N.J. Benson, MA, Ph D (E) C.C. Morf, M Sc, Ph D
C.C. Helwig, BA, Ph D J.B. Peterson, BA, Ph D
H. Lempert, M Sc, Ph D J.W. Pratt, MS, Ph D
R.J. McDonald, M Sc, Ph D R.W. Tafarodi, BA, Ph D
J.R. Mendelson, Ph D (S) P.D. Zelazo, MA, Ph D (U)

Special Lecturers
M. Antony, Ph D, C Psych R. Hetherington, MA, Ph D
M. Bagby, Ph D M.P. McAndrews, B Sc, Ph D
E.A. Bosman, M Sc, Ph D Z.V. Segal, MA, Ph D
J.L. Clewes, MA, Ph D B.B. Toner, MA, Ph D
D. Fletcher, B Sc, Ph D

Tutors
B.S. Miles, MA, Ph D L.F. Paulo, B Sc
L. Murphy-Boyer, B Sc

ANIMAL USE IN LABORATORIES

Laboratory investigations are part of life science programs at the University of Toronto. Programs in life sciences at the University of Toronto include courses that involve observation, handling, or experimentation on animals or on samples derived from animals. The use of animals in teaching and research is regulated by ethical and procedural guidelines and protocols. These are approved on an ongoing basis by the University Animal Care Committee, and follow provincial and federal government rules. We recognize, however, that some students may have strong reservations about personal exposure to any use of animal material in teaching. Students who want to avoid registration in programs or courses that include such labs are, therefore, encouraged to check in advance with the departments involved.

PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS

(See Undergraduate Psychology Handbook for further details)

NOTE: JLP 315H, 374H, 471H; JZP 326H, 428H count as PSY credits for all Psychology programs.

PSYCHOLOGY (B.Sc.)

The programs described in this calendar are relevant to students who have already completed PSY 100Y. Students who are entering the university or are taking PSY 100Y in 1998 will follow a new set of program requirements. The description of these new program requirements can be found in the Undergraduate Psychology Handbook (available from the Department). Please note that students entering university in 1998 will require an OAC Calculus or equivalent to register for any Psychology program. Specialist program: S11601 (9.5 to 13 full courses or their equivalent, including at least one 400-series full course)

Enrolment in the Specialist program is limited. Students apply directly to the Department and may enrol in their Second or Third year.

To enrol in Second year, students must a) have completed 4 full courses; b) have obtained at least 80% in PSY 100Y; c) have a CGPA of at least 3.0; and d) be registered in Statistics.

To enrol in Third year, students must have completed a) PSY 100Y; b) Statistics; and c) at least one half-course from groups 1, 2 and 3 below, with an average of at least 73% across all PSY courses. (Note that this does not mean 73% in each PSY course); and d) have a CGPA of at least 3.0.

NOTE: The courses to include Statistics and 8.5 full courses or equivalent in PSY
First Year: PSY 100Y
Second Year: PSY 203H (please see Department Handbook); PSY 210H; Statistics: PSY (201H, 202H)/ECO 220Y/227Y/GGR 270Y/SOC 300Y/STA (220H, 221H)/250H

Second and Higher Years:
1. At least one of: PSY 220H/230H/240H
2. At least two of: PSY 250H/260H/290H
3. PSY (270H/271H); 280H
4. At least one of: PSY 319Y/329Y/339Y/369Y/379Y/389Y/399Y
5. At least one of: PSY 300H/301H/305H
6. At least one half-course from each of Groups A, B, and C (see below)
7. Two 400-level seminars or one 400-level seminar and the Thesis course (PSY 400Y).

Seminars: JLP 471H/JZP 428H/PSY 401H/407H/408H/409H/410H/420H/430H/440H/450H/460H/470H/ 471H/480H/490H

Major program (B.Sc.): M11601 (7 full courses or their equivalent)

Enrolment in the Major program is limited. Application must be made to the Department. To enrol, students must have a) completed 4 full courses; b) at least 63% in PSY 100Y; c) be registered to take or have completed Statistics; and d) have a CGPA of 2.0.

NOTE: The courses to include Statistics and 6.5 full courses or equivalent in PSY
First Year: PSY 100Y
Second Year: PSY 203H (please see Department Handbook); PSY 210H; Statistics: PSY 201H/ECO 220Y/227Y/GGR 270Y/SOC 300Y/STA 220H/250H

Second and Higher Years:
1. At least one of: PSY 220H/230H/240H
2. At least two of: PSY 250H/260H/290H
3. PSY (270H/271H), 280H
4. At least one half-course from each of Groups A, B, and C (see below)
5. An additional PSY or joint-PSY 300-level or 400-level half-course

Minor program Minor program: R11601 (4 full courses or their equivalent)

Enrolment in the Minor program is limited. Application must be made to the Department. To enrol, students must have a) completed 4 full courses; b) at least 63% in PSY 100Y; c) either be registered to take or have completed Statistics; and d) have a CGPA of 1.7.

NOTE: The courses to include Statistics and 3.5 full courses or equivalent in PSY
First Year: PSY 100Y
Second Year: Statistics: PSY 201H/ECO 220Y/227Y/GGR 270Y/SOC 300Y/STA 220H/250H

Second and Higher Years:
1. At least one of: PSY 210H/220H/230H/240H
2. At least one of: PSY 250H/260H/270H/271H/280H/290H
3. At least one half-course from Group A, and one from Group B or C (see below)
4. An additional PSY or joint-PSY half-course at any level

Group A: JLP 315H/PSY 310H/311H/312H/313H/314H/316H/320H/323H/324H/325H/330H/333H/334H/341H/342H/343H
Group B: JZP 326H/PSY 352H/360H/361H/362H/390H/391H/392/393H/394H/396H
Group C: JLP 374H/PSY 370H/372H/375H/377H/378H/380H/383H

PSYCHOLOGY COURSES

(see Section 4 for Key to Course Descriptions)

For Distribution Requirement purposes, all PSY courses are classified as SCIENCE courses.

SCI199Y
First Year Seminar 52T

Undergraduate seminar that focuses on specific ideas, questions, phenomena or controversies, taught by a regular Faculty member deeply engaged in the discipline. Open only to newly admitted first year students. It may serve as a breadth requirement course; see First Year Seminars: 199Y.

PSY100Y
Introductory Psychology 52L

A survey course introducing students to concepts, issues, and research methods in the broad field of contemporary psychology. Topics include: physiological processes, motivation, learning, perception, memory and thinking, social, developmental, and abnormal psychology.
Exclusion: PSY200H
Prerequisite: There is no OAC prerequisite for PSY100Y; however, students entering the university in 1998 will require an OAC Calculus or equivalent to enrol in any Psychology program subsequent to taking PSY100Y.

200-SERIES COURSES

NOTE 1. PREREQUISITES:

For PSY 201H - 291H courses, students must have completed PSY 100Y and: a) be enrolled in a PSY program, OR b) have obtained at least 70% in PSY 100Y. Students who enrol without meeting these requirements may be removed from the course(s). Additional prerequisites and co-requisites are listed with the course descriptions below.

NOTE 2. PSY 201H, 203H and 210H are balloted. Students wishing to enrol in PSY 201H, 203H or 210H must follow the balloting procedures outlined in the March Access timetable and the Undergraduate Handbook in Psychology (available from the Department beginning April).

PSY200H
The Science of Psychology: Contemporary Issues 39L

A science breadth course for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences, exploring selected major issues for current theory and research. These issues exemplify how psychological science attempts to answer questions, and the kinds of answers which psychology can provide. Unlike PSY100Y, the course does not provide a broad survey of psychology, and does not serve as a prerequisite for other psychology courses.
Exclusion: PSY100Y

Note: Students who have taken PSY200H and wish to pursue further studies in psychology must consult with the Undergraduate Director of Psychology.

This course is primarily intended for Humanities and Social Science students.

PSY201H
Research Design and Analysis in Psychology I 39L, 26T

Basic techniques of data analysis in psychology: the description of psychological data and basic statistical inference applied to psychological data.
Exclusion: ECO220Y/227Y/GGR270Y/SOC300Y/STA220H/250H
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above. This is a balloted course (see Note 2. above)
Recommended preparation: Grade 12 Mathematics

PSY202H
Research Design and Analysis in Psychology II 39L, 26T

Experimental design in psychological research and the statistical analysis of experimental data.
Exclusion: ECO220Y/227Y/GGR270Y/SOC300Y/STA221H/250H
Prerequisite: PSY201H

PSY203H
Biological Foundations of Behaviour 39L

The basis for the biological determination of behaviour and the limitations of this approach. It covers the biological mechanisms which underlie the transmission and expression of behaviour, including fundamental principles of evolution, genetics, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology.
Exclusion: Please see Undergraduate Psychology Handbook
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above. This is a balloted course (see Note 2. above)

PSY210H
Introduction to Development 39L

The developmental approach to the study of behaviour with reference to sensorimotor skills, cognition, socialization, personality, and emotional behaviour.
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY220H
Introduction to Social Psychology 39L

Contemporary areas of research in social psychology: social perception, attitudes, inter-personal relations, and group processes.
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY230H
Personality and Its Transformations 39L

Theory and research in personality structure and dynamics: the interaction of cultural and biological factors in the development and expression of individual differences.
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY240H
Introduction to Abnormal Psychology 39L

A critical survey of concepts, theories, and the state of research in the area of emotionally disturbed persons and therapeutic methods.
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY250H
Introduction to Animal Behaviour 39L

Analysis of behaviour from an ethological point of view. Topics include the structure, causation, and development of behaviour systems and the function and evolution of behaviour.
Prerequisite: Those specified for PSY200-level courses (see Note 1. above)/BIO150Y

PSY260H
Introduction to Learning 39L

Concepts, theories and applications in historical and contemporary contexts: respondent and operant conditioning, reinforcement, extinction, stimulus control (generalization and discrimination) and aversive control (punishment and avoidance).
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY270H
Basic Cognitive Processes 39L

An introduction to research and theory in the study of pattern recognition, attention, memory and mental representation.
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY271H
Higher Cognitive Processes 39L

An introduction to research and theory in the study of language, thinking, reasoning and concept formation.
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY280H
Perception 39L

Emphasizes seeing and hearing. The ways the processing systems work in human and lower animals. Visual perceiving of shape, space, motion, and colour. Auditory perceiving of simple and complex sounds, location. Focus is on the perceiver as seeker and user of information.
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY290H
Physiological Psychology: Sensory and Motor Systems 39L

Animal and human research on topics including: neural signalling, functional anatomy, sensory and motor systems.
Prerequisite: See Note 1. above

PSY291H
Physiological Psychology: Motivation and Learning 39L

Animal and human research on topics including: psychopharmacology, brain chemistry, addiction systems, sexual behaviour, psychopathology, memory and higher cognitive functions.
Prerequisite: PSY290H

PSY299Y
Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. See Research Opportunity Program for details.

300-SERIES COURSES

NOTE All lab courses (PSY 319Y, 329Y, 339Y, 369Y, 379Y, 389Y, 399Y) and individual project courses (PSY 303H, 304H) are balloted. Students wishing to enrol in these courses must follow the balloting procedures as outlined in the March Access timetable and the Undergraduate Handbook in Psychology (available from the Department beginning April).

PSY300H
History of Psychology 39L

Philosophical predecessors and early development of modern psychology; schools of thought and shifting areas of theory and research. History and philosophy of science, in general. Current systems and theories.
Prerequisite: One full course or equivalent in the PSY200- or 300-series

PSY303H
/304H Individual Projects TBA

An intensive laboratory or applied research project under the supervision of a staff member. Will be approved by the Department only when the student and staff member can show that the project is academically demanding and uniquely suitable for the individual student in terms of the rest of the student's program.
Prerequisite: PSY202H and appropriate background for the proposed work

PSY305H
The Treatment of Psychological Data 39L

The application of statistical and psychometric procedures to psychological data. Use of the computer is emphasized in the analysis of several data sets.
Prerequisite: PSY202H

PSY310H
Principles of Behaviour Development 39L

Brief consideration of some principles of embryology followed by behavioural embryology, development of perceptual mechanisms, movement patterns and behaviour systems including feeding, prey catching and aggression. Examples primarily from non-human species. (Offered in alternate years)
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H/250H

PSY311H
Social Development 39L

Theory and research in social attachment, aggression, morality, imitation and identification, altruism, and parental discipline, with discussion of methodological issues.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H

PSY312H
Cognitive Development 39L

Age-related changes in knowledge acquisition, reasoning, and the control of behaviour. Traditional perspectives (e.g., Baldwin, Vygotsky, Piaget) and current issues (e.g., neuropsychology, future-oriented behaviour, theory of mind).
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H/270H/271H

PSY313H
Psychology of Aging 39L

Age changes in sensory and perceptual processes, motor skill, learning, memory, and personality. Theory, methodological problems, social, cultural, and environmental influences which shape behaviour and attitudes to and by the elderly.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H

PSY314H
Moral Development 39L

Examination of cognitive-developmental, psychoanalytic, sociobiological, behaviouristic and cultural-anthropological approaches to moral development. Issues covered include definitions of morality, the relationship between moral judgement and action, gender differences and commonalities, and the role of culture in moral development.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H

JLP315H
Language Acquisition 39L

Infants' abilities at birth, prelinguistic development, the first words, phonological, syntactic and semantic development. Social variables influencing development of language, bilingualism, models of development, language play. (Given by the Departments of Linguistics and Psychology)
Prerequisite: One full course equivalent at the 200-level in JAL/JUP/LIN/PSL/PSY

PSY316H
Perceptual Development 39L

The course examines human perceptual development during the first 2-3 years of life. Vision and audition are emphasized. Some topics are: pattern and colour vision, depth perception, infant speech perception.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H, 280H

PSY319Y
Developmental Psychology Laboratory 104P

A series of research projects. Each project includes the design of a study, data collection and analysis, and a written report.
Prerequisite: PSY202H, 210H, 70% average in PSY courses
Co-requisite: PSY305H

PSY320H
Social Psychology: Attitudes 39L

Intensive study of social attitudes and opinions development, description, measurement, modification, and organization.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 220H, one further PSY200/300-series full course or equivalent

PSY323H
Sex Roles and Behaviour 39L

The effect of sex-role expectations on how men and women behave and perceive the world: theories of sex-role development, physiological and cultural determinants of sex differences, power relationships between men and women.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H/220H/230H, one further PSY200/300-series full course or equivalent

PSY324H
Human Motivation 39L

Survey course of theories and research in human motivation with a particular focus on social psychological perspectives.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 220H/230H, one further PSY200/300-series full course or equivalent

PSY325H
Psychology of Self 39L

An examination of long-standing and contemporary issues in research on the self, addressing its conceptual, motivational, cognitive and cultural aspects.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 220H, 230H

JZP326H
Biological Rhythms 26L, 13T

Daily, monthly, annual and other rhythms and methods of measuring them. Behavioural and physiological aspects of biological clocks. The importance of rhythms in experimental design, in research on brain function, in affective disorders, and the use animals make of rhythms in migration and other behaviours. (Given by the Departments of Psychology and Zoology)
Prerequisite: BIO150Y/PSY100Y, one full or two 200-series half-courses in the Sciences

PSY329Y
Social Psychology Laboratory 104P

Introduction to methods and techniques of research in social psychology. Students criticize articles, design research, and carry out a major research project.
Prerequisite: PSY202H, 220H, 70% average in PSY courses

Recommended Co-requisite: PSY305H

PSY330H
Psychometrics 39L

Concepts and methods for the measurement of abilities, interests and personality: reliability, validity, interpretation of test scores, norms, observational methods, structured tests, interview, projective techniques. Ethical problems in assessment. Not a course in test administration.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 230H/240H

PSY333H
Health Psychology 39L

Examines research evidence concerning the impact of psychological factors on physical health and illness.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 230H/240H

PSY334H
Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief 39L

Culture appears to have a narrative structure. Animal learning and neuropsychological theory helps us understand how narratives might regulate emotion. Threat of broadscale emotional dysregulation motivates individuals to protect their cultures.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 230H/240H

PSY339Y
Individual Differences Laboratory 104P

Introduction to methods involved in individual differences or personality research. Group and individual projects focus on assessment of individual difference characteristics and on experimentation including such characteristics.
Prerequisite: PSY202H, 230H, 70% average in PSY courses

PSY341H
Psychopathologies of Childhood 39L

This course focuses on cognitive and neuropsychological aspects of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders in children from clinical and theoretical perspectives.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H/240H, one further PSY200/300-series full course or equivalent

PSY342H
Learning Theory: Applications and Extensions 26S, 13T

The applications of behavioral research in learning theory, developmental psychology and developmental psychopathology to investigations of socially relevant issues.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 210H/260H

PSY343H
Theories of Psychopathology and Psychotherapy 39L

Examines various theories of how personality functioning may become impaired and corresponding psychotherapeutic interventions. Emphasis on empirical assessment of personality dysfunction and therapy effectiveness.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 230H/240H

PSY352H
The Evolution of Social Behaviour 39L

Evolutionary models of social behaviour in animals, the origins of sociobiology, and a biological approach to human social organization. (Offered in alternate years.)
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 250H/ZOO222H

PSY360H
Conditioning and Learning: Theories and Applications 39L

An advanced course that considers classical and instrumental conditioning as scientific phenomena, and examines several conditioning applications such as biofeedback.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 260H

PSY362H
Animal Cognition 39L

The study of memory, representation, concept learning, and other cognitive processes in non-human animals using the methods of operant and Pavlovian conditioning.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 260H

PSY369Y
Conditioning and Learning Laboratory 104P

Practical experience in conducting experiments, initially under close supervision. Class discussion relating experiments to previous research. Formal written reports. Subjects: rat, pigeon, goldfish, human.
Prerequisite: PSY202H, 260H; 70% average in PSY courses

PSY370H
Thinking and Reasoning 26L, 18P

Problem-solving as a model of directed thinking; conceptual behaviour and mental representation; induction, deduction and learning; probabilistic reasoning; creative thinking and complex problem solving.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 271H

PSY372H
Human Memory 39L

Current theories and data on human memory: processes involved in encoding, storage, and retrieval.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 270H

JLP374H
Psychology of Language 39L

Human and other animal communication, structure of human language, word meaning and semantic memory, psychological studies of syntax, bilingualism, language and thought, language errors and disorders. (Given by the Departments of Linguistics and Psychology)
Prerequisite: One 200-series full course or equivalent in JAL/JUP/LIN/PSY/PSL

PSY375H
Attention and Performance 39L

Visual attention; attentional selection for object recognition, feature integration, and action; movements of attention; eye-hand coordination, eye movements, limb movements. Models of attention and motor control.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 270H/280H

PSY377H
Neural Network Models of Psychological Processes 39L

Networks of neurons learn by adapting the strengths of their interconnections. These networks are used as models of psychological processes including perception and concept formation. Almost no programming skills are required.
Prerequisite: PSY100Y, 201H; OAC Calculus

PSY378H
Engineering Psychology 39L

The application of our knowledge of human information processing capabilities to improve human-machine systems design in a number of engineering environments including aviation, architecture, computer software, human-computer interaction, management information systems, and nuclear power plants.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 270H/271H/280H
Recommended preparation: PSY202H

PSY379Y
Memory and Learning Laboratory 104P

Exercises and demonstrations, followed by experiments done jointly with other members of the class, and a final individual research project, in the broad area of human learning and memory.
Prerequisite: PSY202H, 270H, 271H, 70% average in PSY courses

PSY380H
Contemporary Issues in Perception 39L

Current developments in research and theory in the area of perception. Content in any given year depends on instructor. Consult departmental booklet for full description.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 280H

PSY383H
Environmental Psychology 39L

The study of peoples' responses to, and perceptions of the natural and built environment. Design of the objects we use, and the spaces which we inhabit.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, two of 270H/271H/280H/Specialist or Major in a Division of the Environment program or Innis College

PSY389Y
Perception Laboratory 104P

Experiments undertaken under supervision requiring formal written reports. Readings and discussion on methodological problems and issues in perceptual measurement, and the design of experiments on perceiving.
Prerequisite: PSY202H, 280H, 70% average in PSY courses

PSY390H
Advanced Topics in Physiological Psychology 39L

Examination in depth of a limited set of topics in physiological psychology. Content in any given year depends on instructor. Consult departmental booklet for full description.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 290H

PSY391H
A Biobehavioural Approach to Psychological Theories and Applications 39L

In presenting and arguing for this approach the topics covered are sex differences in cognition, and the psychophysiological topics of biofeedback and lie detection. Students are expected to critically evaluate the approach, and argue for their own.
Prerequisite: PSY201H and two additional courses at the 200-level

PSY392H
Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 39L

Understanding the complexities of how the mammalian nervous system acquires and stores information and how it transforms this information into appropriate behavior is fundamentally important to our understanding of both animal and human behavior. This course explores empirical and theoretical contributions to our understanding of the neural basis of learning and memory.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 290H, 291H

PSY393H
Cognitive Neurology 39L

The use of higher cortical functions to study cognitive processes in humans and other primates. Some topics to be covered: hemispheric specialization, emotion and the cerebral hemispheres, organization of language after brain damage, amnesia, aging.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 270H/271H/290H

PSY394H
Physiology and Psychology of Emotion 39L

The role of brain and body in expression and experience of emotion in humans, considered theoretically and through the experimental, physiological and clinical literatures.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 290H
Recommended preparation: PSY291H

PSY396H
Neurochemical Basis of Behaviour 26L, 13T

The functional relevance of neurotransmitters, with particular emphasis on their role in mediating behaviour.
Prerequisite: PSY201H, 291H

PSY399Y
Psychobiology Laboratory 104P

Methods in physiological psychology, including experience in the design of an experiment, data collection, analysis, and written reports. Qualified students may do an original experiment in physiological psychology. Surgery with rodents is required
Prerequisite: PSY202H, 290H, 291H, 70% average in PSY courses

400-SERIES COURSES

NOTE All PSY 400-series courses are balloted. PSY 400Y - 490H require both a) PSY 202H (or equivalent) and b) certain PSY 300-series courses (specified in the Undergraduate Handbook in Psychology) as prerequisites. Please consult the Undergraduate Handbook in Psychology (available from the Department beginning April) for prerequisites and balloting procedures.

PSY400Y
Thesis TBA

An individual project done under the direction of a staff member. Lecture and seminar presentations of proposals in the Fall Term.
Prerequisite: PSY305H, 319Y/329Y/339H/369Y/379Y/389Y/399Y

PSY401H/402H/403H/404H
Psychology Seminar 26S

Examination in depth of specific topics in psychology. These seminars vary from year to year in terms of the number given, the topics, and the restrictions on enrollment. Consult the departmental calendar for details.

PSY407H
Seminar on Psychological Theory 26S

The role of theory in psychology critically examined through consideration of psychological controversies.

PSY408H
Decision Theory and Decision Behaviour I 26S

Individual decision making under certainty, uncertainty, and risk. Subjective aspects of risk. Multi-objective decisions. Theory of social choice. Two-person constant sum games.
Exclusion: UNI310Y
Prerequisite: One course in Statistics
Recommended preparation: Familiarity with probability theory

PSY409H
Decision Theory and Decision Behaviour II 26S

Noncooperative and cooperative games. Social traps (dilemmas). Indices of power and allocation problems. Formation of political coalitions. Psychology of group decisions.
Prerequisite: One course in Statistics
Recommended preparation: Familiarity with probability theory

PSY410H
Developmental Psychology 26S

Examination in depth of a limited topic within developmental psychology. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

PSY420H
Social Psychology Seminar 26S

Examination in depth of a limited topic within social psychology. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

JZP428H
Advanced Topics in Biological Rhythms 26S

Circadian rhythms with emphasis on non-photic entrainment and phase shifting of rhythms by behaviour (e.g., social interactions, or becoming active). Properties and physiological mechanisms for non-photic effects and comparisons with those for photic effects. Seminars and readings of original papers. Emphasis on basic principles, but possible applications will also be discussed. (Given by the Departments of Psychology and Zoology)

PSY430H
Personality Seminar 26S

Examination in depth of a limited topic within the area of personality. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

PSY440H
Abnormal Psychology Seminar 26S

Examination in depth of a limited topic within abnormal psychology. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

PSY450H
Animal Behaviour Seminar 26S

Comparison of psychological and ethological approaches to the problems of the structure, causation, ontogeny and phylogeny of behaviour.

PSY460H
Learning Seminar 26S

Examination in depth of a limited topic in learning. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

PSY470H
Memory Seminar 26S

Examination in depth of limited topics within the area of memory. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

JLP471H
Advanced Psycholinguistics 26S

Seminar in advanced topics in psycholinguistics. Content varies from year to year. (Given by the Departments of Linguistics and Psychology)

PSY471H
Cognition Seminar 26S

Examination in depth of a limited topic in cognition. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

PSY480H
Perception Seminar 26S

Examination in depth of limited topics in perception. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

PSY490H
Brain Activity & Behaviour Seminar 39S

The relationship between behaviour and the activity of neurons; examples from sensory, motor, motivational, and higher cortical systems. Electrical stimulation and recording techniques.


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Revised: April 6, 1998

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