A & S Calendar 1998-99: NEW COLLEGE PROGRAMS AND COURSES
Arts & Science Calendar 1998-99: Table of Contents: Programs and Courses
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NEW COLLEGE


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Introduction

New College courses have in common a commitment to be explorative and inventive and to widen students' experience by critically examining relationships among academic disciplines. A number of courses take their place within such well-defined programs as Women's Studies, Equity Studies, African Studies, and Caribbean Studies. These programs co-ordinated by New College are open to all students in the University.

Integration of student experience is a major concern in a college with students from all faculties in the University. Several courses are designed specifically to deal with this concern. The Minor in Humanism provides a perspective on the problem of self-knowledge as seen in selected texts in literature, science, and religion. The Independent Studies courses provide an opportunity for students to design their own programs and to test their analytic, synthetic, and creative skills by writing a thesis.

The African Studies Program (Specialist, Major, Minor) offers opportunities to study Africa through a selection of courses devoted to African history, society and culture. The core courses are drawn from anthropology, history, literature and political science.

The Caribbean Studies Program (Major, Minor) consists of courses in Caribbean history, literature and thought that deal with issues including gender, religion, politics, culture, ethnicity, race, development, language, colonialism and regional common markets.

The Equity Studies Program (Major) is an interdisciplinary program that examines various models — historically and culturally specific — for conceptualizing social inequities and for bringing about equity. It draws together discourses on equity from the humanities, social sciences and sciences.

The Human Biology Program (Specialist, Major) integrates the study of life sciences in the Faculty of Arts and Science with the basic medical sciences taught by departments in the Faculty of Medicine. (See Basic Medical Sciences section of the Calendar.)

The Humanism Program (Minor) provides an opportunity for undergraduates studying different subjects to read, discuss and examine critically a wide historical and culture range of primary sources by major authors whose ideas underlie current preoccupations in the sciences, philosophy, literature, religion and law.

The Women's Studies Program (Specialist, Major, Minor) offers a wide variety of courses in a rapidly developing and intellectually fertile field. Courses cover such issues as the representation and social organization of sexual differences, women and health, gender issues in law, women in world cultures, women and issues of international development and the history of feminism.

Program Secretary's Office: New College, Room 2016 (978-5404)

Registrar's Office: New College, Room 107 (978-2460)

NEW COLLEGE PROGRAMS

AFRICAN STUDIES (B.A.)

Consult Program Director, Dr. D. Eyoh, New College, 978-8288. For general enquiries call 978-5404.

Enrolment in the Specialist, Major and Minor programs in African Studies is open to students who have completed four courses; no minimum GPA required.

Specialist program (Hon.B.A.): S17071 (11 full courses or their equivalent including at least one 400-series course)
First Year: NEW 150Y
Higher Years:
1. Four courses from Group A, to be chosen from at least two different departments/programs
2. Four courses from Groups B and/or C
3. A combination of two language courses as outlined in Group D
4. Four of the eleven courses must be 300/400 series, including at least one 400-series course

Major program: M17071 (6 full courses or their equivalent)
First Year: NEW 150Y
Higher Years:
1. Three courses to be chosen from Groups A and/or B
2. Two courses from NEW 280Y/380Y or from Group C
3. At least two of the six courses must be 300-series courses

Minor program: R17071 (4 full courses or their equivalent)
First Year: NEW 150Y
Higher Years:
1. Two courses from either Groups A or B and one from Group C - or - NEW 280Y+380Y, and one course from Group C
2. At least one course must be a 300/400-series course

Group A: ANT 325Y, 345Y; FRE 402H, 432H; HIS 295Y, 383Y, 395Y, 495Y; NEW 322Y; POL 301Y, 488H, 489H; an independent studies course approved by the Program Committee

Group B: ANT 200Y, 204Y; HIS 101Y, 232Y; NMC 185Y; MUS 200H; NEW 223Y; POL 201Y

Group C: ANT 340H, 341H, 342H, 343Y, 351H, 363Y, 441H, 449Y, 451H; HIS 294Y, 302Y, 408Y; JPE 400Y; NEW 425Y; POL 325Y, 417Y, 418Y, 445Y, 451H, 479H; SOC 307Y, 312Y, 325Y

Group D: NEW 280Y/380Y, or FSL 181Y, 182H, 183H, and two of FSL 262H/263H/264H/265H/282H/283H/362H/363H, or NMC 210Y/310Y, or PRT 100Y/220Y, or PRT 210Y/220Y, or two courses in a major African language approved by the Program Committee

CARIBBEAN STUDIES (B.A.)

Consult Program Director, Dr. A. Itwaru, New College, 978-8966. For general enquiries call 978-8966 or 978-5404.

Enrolment in the Major and Minor programs in Caribbean Studies is open to students who have completed four courses; no minimum GPA required.

Major program: M15451 (6 full courses or their equivalent including two at the 300+level)
1. NEW 224Y, 324Y
2. Four courses, including at least one at the 300+level, from Group A below.

Minor program: S15451 (4 full courses or their equivalent including one at the 300-level)
1. NEW 224Y, 324Y
2. Two courses, including one at the 300+level, from Group A Group A: ANT 345Y, 362Y, 451H; ENG 253Y, 472Y, 473Y; HIS 294Y; NEW 223Y, 322Y, 325H;

POL 201Y, 305Y, 445Y; SPA 380H, 381H, 386H

EQUITY STUDIES (B.A.)

For general enquiries call Program Co-ordinator, Professor J. Larkin, 923-6641 ext. 2256.

Enrolment in this program is open to students who have completed four courses; no minimum GPA required.

Major program: M11401 (7 full courses or their equivalent, including two at the 300+level)
1. NEW 240Y
2. One or more full-course equivalents from at least three of the four groups: Groups A, B, C, and D below

Note: at least 2 of the 7 required courses must be at the 300+level.

Group A: ANT 343Y; CLA 219H, 220H; EAS 451H; ENG 233Y; FCS 294H; FRE 400H, 401H, 402H; GGR 455H; HIS 245Y, 363H, 399H, 439Y; INI 323Y; ITA 455Y; JAL 355Y; JPP 343Y; NEW 160Y, 261Y, 334H, 335H, 360Y, 362H, 363H, 365H, 367H, 368H, 369H, 371H, 372H, 373H, 425Y; NMC 455Y; PHL 267H; POL 432H, 450H; PSY 323H; SOC 365Y; SPA 382H, VIC 410Y; VIS 209H

Group B: ANT 204Y, 325Y, 342Y, 344Y, 345Y, 362Y, 446H, 448H, 451H, 453H, 456H; ENG 253Y, FRE 402H; HIS 208Y, 294Y, 370H, 383Y, 384Y, 393H, 394H, 398Y, 406Y, 408Y, 456Y, 474Y, 478Y; INI 327Y; NEW 224Y, 230Y, 322Y, 324Y; NMC 384Y, 484Y; POL 304Y, 321H; RLG 220H, 237Y, 314H, 344Y; SOC 210Y, 330Y; SPA 382H

Group C: FCS 397H; HIS 430Y; POL 315H; NEW 374H; PHE 403H; PHL 243H; UNI 255H, 355H

Group D: ABS 200Y, 300Y; 320Y; ANT 365Y; CLA 331H; ECO 239Y, 332H, 339Y, 340H, 369Y, 424H, 425H; ENG 254Y; FRE 434H; HIS 106Y, 313Y, 369H, 395Y, 410Y, 417Y, 442Y, 472Y; HPS 314Y, 324Y; PHL 281Y, 384H; PHM 420H; POL 405Y; RLG 201Y; SOC 220Y, 301Y, 338Y, 370Y, 480Y

Note: Students are responsible for checking the co- and prerequisites for all courses in Groups A, B,C, and D

HUMANISM (B.A.)

Consult Professor M.F. Dixon, New College, 978-6487. For general enquiries call 978-2460.

Enrolment in this program is open to students who have completed four courses; no minimum GPA required.

Minor program: R07801 (4 full courses or their equivalent)
1. NEW 200Y, 300Y, 309Y
2. One full-course equivalent from HPS 200Y, 201H, 202H; HUM 199Y; NMC 185Y, 263H; NEW 302Y, 305H, 306H, 308H; RLG 204Y, 205Y, 206Y, 231Y

WOMEN'S STUDIES (B.A.)

Consult Undergraduate Coordinator, Professor J. Larkin, 923-6641, ext. 2256. For general enquires call the Program Office (946-3817)

Enrolment in the Specialist, Major, and Minor programs in Women's Studies is open to students who have completed four courses; no minimum GPA required.

Specialist program (Hon.B.A.): S05711 (10 full courses or their equivalent, including at least one 400-series course)
First Year: NEW 160Y
Higher Years:
1. Four full-course equivalents from Core Group below, excluding NEW 160Y
2. NEW 460Y
3. Four full-course equivalents from Group A or B, including at least three 300+ series

Major program: M05711 (7 full courses or their equivalent, including at least three 300+ series courses)
First Year: NEW 160Y
Higher Years:
1. Three full-course equivalents from Core Group below, excluding NEW 160Y
2. Three other full-course equivalents from Group A or B

Minor program: R05711 (4 full courses or their equivalent)
1. NEW 160Y and/or 261Y
2. Two or three full-course equivalents from the Core Group or Group A, including at least one 300+ series course

Core Group: NEW 160Y, 261Y, 330H-339H, 360Y, 362H, 363H, 365H, 367H, 368H, 369H, 371H, 372H, 373H, 374H, 425Y, 434H, 435H, 451H, 460Y, 462H, 463H, 470Y

Group A: (Women and gender relations): ANT 343Y; CLA 219H, 220H; EAS 451Y; ENG 233Y, 468H; FAH 406H; FCS 294H; FRE 400H, 401H, 402H; HIS 308Y, 359Y, 383Y, 434Y, 439Y, 483Y; INI 323Y; JAL 355H; JPP 343Y; NEW 325H; NMC 384Y, 455Y, 484Y; PHL 243H, 267H; POL 315Y, 432Y, 450H, 480Y; PSY 323H; RLG 237Y, 314H; SOC 214Y, 333Y, 365Y; SPA 382H; VIS 209H

Group B: (General interest): ANT 342Y, 365Y; EAS 239H; ENG 290Y; FCS 395H; INI 327Y; JAL 253H; NEW 207Y; PHL 281Y, 384H; SOC 207Y, 215Y, 302Y, 375Y; TRN 311H, 320Y

NEW COLLEGE COURSES

(see Section 4 for Key to Course Descriptions)

For Distribution Requirement purposes, all NEW courses are classified as HUMANITIES courses except NEW 261Y and 425Y, which are SOCIAL SCIENCE courses.

African Studies Courses

NEW150Y
Introduction to African Studies 52L

A multi-disciplinary study of Africa, emphasizing inquiry and critical analysis. Pre-colonial, colonial and contemporary African history, anthropology, politics, African humanism and society, religion, art, music, race, resistance, gender and Pan-Africanism.

NEW223Y
Caribbean Literature and Society (See Caribbean Studies below)

NEW280Y
Introductory Swahili 26L, 78T

Introduction to grammar and basic vocabulary of Swahili. Emphasis on comprehension and oral practice. Reading of selected texts. Relation of the language to its East African cultural context. (Offered in alternate years)

NEW322Y
The Contemporary African Novel 52S

Novels written in the last thirty years by English, French and Portuguese-speaking Africans. Ideological views concerning colonialism and neo-colonialism. Tradition, religious and secular; the use of African symbolism. A small number of historical and sociological texts are recommended as essential background reading. Works not written in English are read in translation. (Offered in alternate years)

NEW380Y
Intermediate Swahili 26L, 78T

Grammar and syntax. Conversation and written composition. Reading of texts: literary, journalistic. Relation of the language to its East African context. (Offered in alternate years)
Prerequisite: NEW280Y

Caribbean Studies Courses

NEW223Y
Caribbean Literature and Society 52S

A study of Caribbean writers of fiction, poetry and drama, drawn from the major linguistic and racial/cultural groups in the region. Works are analyzed as literary texts and within the contexts of social and political life in which the writing is situated. (Offered in alternate years)

NEW224Y
Caribbean Thought I 52L

A multi-disciplinary exploration of writing pertaining to culture and consciousness particularly Afro- and Indo-Caribbean thought: theoretical perspectives on the implications and consequences of slavery and indenture, the struggle for freedom from the legacy of the plantation and colonial dependence, responses to domination and exploitation, race, gender, religion and music.
Recommended preparation: HIS101Y

NEW324Y
Caribbean Thought II 52L

Critical enquiry at an advanced level into the construction of society, race, language, religion, culture and gender; theories of economy, resistance, self-affirmation, continuing colonization and place of the Caribbean within the global context; internal and external theoretical perspectives on "the Caribbean personality."
Prerequisite: NEW224Y

NEW325H
Caribbean Women Thinkers 26L

An examination of the historical and political significance of writings (literary, political, scholarly) by Caribbean women who engage problems within Caribbean culture and provide insights into the endeavours of the peoples of the region.

Equity Studies Course

NEW240Y
Introduction to Equity Studies 52L

An interdisciplinary study of issues of social diversity exploring debates about the origins of inequity and the various means of addressing it. Course readings draw from a broad range of relevant literature in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural and Medical Sciences.

Humanism Courses

NEW200Y
Humanism I: Classical to Renaissance Thought 52L, 26T

Issues of human self-knowledge in Greek, Roman, and Judeo-Christian cultures; problems of historical perspective and critical method. The Bible, Classical myth, Augustine, Bacon, Castiglione, Cicero, Dante, Homer, Machiavelli, Plato, Sophocles: read in English translation. (Offered in alternate years)

NEW300Y
Humanism II: Enlightenment and Post-Enlightenment Thought 52L, 26T

Impact of the scientific paradigm and varieties of modern Romanticism on Humanist concepts of Man's identity as a social, natural, and moral creature, reflected in works by: Darwin, Freud, Goethe, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Marx, J.S. Mill, Rousseau, Tolstoy, Voltaire. A sequel to Humanism I. May be taken independently. Works not written in English are read in translation. (Offered in alternate years)

NEW302Y
C.G. Jung and Humanism 52L

Impact of Jung's analytical psychology, critical methodology and interpretative practice on issues in religion, anthropology, art and literature, popular culture, gender studies and postmodernist critique. Theoretical studies include traditional Jungian and contemporary post-Jungian texts together with anti-Jungian, feminist, and non-Jungian sources.

NEW306H
Philosophy and Theory of Tagore 26L

Examines Rabindranath Tagore's concepts of humanity, art, personality, freedom, nationalism, ashram, teacher-student relationship, rural reconstruction.

NEW308H
Humanism of Satyajit Ray 26L

Exploration of humane vision expressed through the multi-faceted creativity of Satyajit Ray, 20th-century author, painter, musical composer and foremost director of India's "New Wave" cinema.

NEW309Y
Humanism III: Varieties of "Humanism" in the 20th Century 52L, 26T

Fragmentation of humanist culture and the struggle to establish alternative answers to fundamental questions of human identity and purpose, as represented in works by: Beckett, Camus, Cassirer, Conrad, Foucault, Gould, Kafka, Kuhn, Langer, McLuhan, Ryle, Sartre, Skinner, and Watson. A sequel to NEW200Y and NEW300Y. May be taken independently. Works not written in English are read in translation. (Offered in alternate years)

Independent Studies Courses

These courses provide an opportunity for individual students or groups of students to design a cross-disciplinary course of study not otherwise available within the Faculty of Arts and Science. Students work closely with a supervisor. Written applications (detailed proposal, reading list and a letter of support from a faculty who is prepared to supervise) should be made through the Program Director for approval by the College's Committee for Academic Affairs by May 1 for the Winter Session or by January 1 for the Summer Session. Students will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of an application.

Enquiries: New College, Room 2045 (978-5404)

NEW299Y
Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. See Research Opportunity Program for details.

NEW390Y/490Y New College Independent Studies
TBA

Prerequisite: Permission of College

NEW391H/491H New College Independent Studies
TBA

Prerequisite: Permission of College

Women's Studies Courses

NEW160Y
Introduction to Women's Studies (formerly NEW260Y) 52L, 26T

The position of women in contemporary Western Society. Women's sexuality, socialization, economic and political roles, creative production in the arts, and theories of women's liberation in historical and contemporary contexts.
Exclusion: NEW260Y

NEW261Y
Scientific Perspectives on Sex and Gender 52L, 26T

A psychological, anthropological and biological study of sex and gender. The influence of gender socialization on behaviour, cognition, emotion and motivation; the diversity of sex-role behaviour in primate and human societies; prenatal and neonatal sex differentiation, the nature and determination of gender, the existence of sex in an evolutionary perspective.

This is a Social Science course

NOTE Courses numbered NEW 330H - 339H are reserved for Special Topics in Women's Studies offered each year by visiting scholars. Topics will change according to the interests of the instructor.

NEW334H/335H Special Topic in Women's Studies
39S

An upper level seminar.
Recommended preparation: NEW160Y/NEW261Y

NEW360Y
Feminisms, Texts, Theories 78L

Examination of classical feminist texts, central theoretical debate and feminist research methodologies.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y
Recommended preparation: HIS350Y/JPP343Y/NEW261Y/PHL267H

NEW362H
Selected Topics in the History of Feminism 26S

An upper level seminar. Subjects of study vary from year to year.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y/261Y

NEW363H
Selected Topics in Feminist Theory 26S

An upper level seminar. Subjects of study vary from year to year.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y/261Y
Co-requisite: NEW360Y

NEW365H
Gender Issues in the Law 26L

An investigation of the extent to which the law incorporates a white middle class, male perspective and therefore fails adequately to take account of women's interests and the diversity of women's experience. Legal issues concerning sexuality, the family, employment, and reproduction.
Exclusion: NEW362H (1982-83)
Recommended preparation: NEW160Y/261Y

NEW367H
Women and Health 26L, 13T

Issues of importance to women as providers and recipients of health care; an analysis of the origins and theoretical perspectives of the contemporary women's health movement.
Recommended preparation: NEW160Y/261Y/PHL282H/SOC325Y

NEW368H
Women in World Cultures (formerly NEW368Y) 26L

This course examines both the diversity and shared experiences of women in non-western societies using a comparative and historical perspective. The concepts of universal subordination, of patriarchy, and a consciousness which categorizes women in non-western societies as "the other" (exotic), are among topics we evaluate critically.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y/261Y/permission of the instructor

NEW369Y
European Colonialism and the Politics of Representation (formerly NEW369H) 52L

How do representations of gender, class, sexuality, and "the other" intersect in colonial and neocolonial contexts? Topics include the rise of racialist, feminist, democratic, liberatory, and neoconservative discourses in a variety of literary texts and cultural media.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y/261Y/permission of the instructor

NEW371H
Contemporary Popular Culture: Feminist Perspectives 26L

An interdisciplinary course examining media, forms of entertainment, and daily life practices, and focussing on the role of women and girls as consumers and producers of popular culture.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y/261Y/permission of the instructor

NEW372H
Women and Psychology/Psychoanalysis 26L

An interdisciplinary analysis of the relationship of women to a variety of psychological and psychoanalytical theories and practices. Topics may include women and the psychological establishment; women's mental health issues; feminist approaches to psychoanalysis.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y/261Y/permission of the instructor

NEW373H
Women and Violence 26L

Women and violence as theorized by second and third-wave feminism. Topics may include racism and sexism in representations of violence against women; questions of victimhood and agency; legal issues; pornography and censorship debates; current forms of resistance and community mobilization.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y/261Y/permission of the instructor

NEW374H
Female Sexualities 26L

An examination of female sexual practices, sexualized subjectivities, and constructions of female sexuality in a wide variety of specific historical and cultural contexts: the role of class, ethno-cultural constraints, medical and scientific discourses; contemporary debates on sexual identity, practice and representation.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y

NEW425Y
Women and Issues of International Development 52S

This course critically analyzes theories of colonialism/imperialism, neocolonialism, "development" and concepts/policies and methodologies of women in Development (WID) program of governments, international agencies, the World Bank and the IMF.
Prerequisite: One of ANT204Y/HIS101Y/NEW160Y/POL201Y and one 300-level course in Women's Studies or one of POL301Y/305Y

This is a Social Science course

NEW434H/435H Special Topic Women
26S

An upper level seminar. Topics vary from year to year depending on instructor.
Recommended preparation: NEW160Y/261Y

NEW451H
Independent Study in Women's Issues TBA

Under supervision, students pursue topics in Women's Studies not currently part of the curriculum.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director, Women's Studies

NEW460Y
Advanced Research Seminar in Women's Studies TBA

Supervised individual research project undertaken in Third or Fourth year. Students attend a seminar to discuss research methods and findings.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director, Women's Studies
Recommended preparation: NEW362H, 363H

NEW462H
Advanced Topics in the History of Feminism 26S

Senior students may pursue more advanced study in feminist theory. Topics vary from year to year depending on instructor.
Prerequisite: NEW362H

NEW463H
Advanced Topics in Feminist Theory 26S

Senior students may pursue more advanced study in feminist theory. Topics vary from year to year depending on instructor.
Prerequisite: NEW363H

NEW470Y
Women's Studies Practicum 52S

The application of theoretical study to practical community experience. Advanced Women's Studies students have the opportunity to apply knowledge acquired in the Women's Studies curriculum through a practicum placement within a community organization.
Prerequisite: NEW160Y and at least one Women's Studies NEW 300/400-level course

Other New College Courses

NEW207Y
The Science Fiction Novel 52L

Survey of the science fiction novel from Verne and Wells to the present. Includes the reading and discussion of 20-25 novels.

NEW230Y
Writing and the Holocaust 52S

Examination of the ways that prose writers of various nationalities and backgrounds have worked to meet the literary challenge presented by the Nazi attempt to exterminate the Jews of Europe in World War II. Authors considered include Primo Levi, Tadeusz Borowski, Aaron Appelfeld, Andre Schwarz-Bart, Elie Wiesel, Saul Bellow, Phillip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, Mordecai Richler, David Grossman.

NEW305H
Faith and Science 26S

Issues of concern common to scientific and religious discourses: belief and knowledge; mechanism and motivation; age of the universe; concepts of species origin; consciousness; free will; geocentrism; proving a creator; likelihood in religion; critical criteria for a prophecy.


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