Arts & Science Calendar 1998-99: Table of Contents: Programs and Courses
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WDW WOODSWORTH


On this page: Introduction | Faculty Members | Programs | Courses
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Introduction

Woodsworth College sponsors programs in two areas - Criminology and Employment Relations. The major program in Criminology provides students with a foundation to begin the study of crime and the administration of the Canadian criminal justice system. The program in Criminology may be combined with a program in Political Science, Psychology or Sociology.

The specialist and major programs in Employment Relations provide students with the opportunity to study the employment relationship in a Canadian context, from the perspectives of a number of disciplines such as economics, history, law, management, political science, and sociology. Students enrolled in the Criminology and Employment Relations programs are given priority when registering in WDW courses.

Enquiries: Undergraduate Secretary, Mr. Damon Chevrier, Woodsworth College, Room 220 (978-2411); chevrier@woodsworth.utoronto.ca

Faculty Members

Professors
A.N. Doob, AB, Ph D C.D. Shearing, MA, Ph D

Associate Professors
P.C. Stenning, BA, LLM, SJD M. Valverde, MA, Ph D

Assistant Professors
C. Strange, MA, Ph D S. Wortley, MA, Ph D

WOODSWORTH COLLEGE PROGRAMS

CRIMINOLOGY (B.A.)

Consult Mr. Damon Chevrier, Woodsworth College.

Enrolment in the major program in Criminology is limited. Students must apply during the spring term of the year in which they complete their fourth full-credit course. Students must also have completed one of the courses specified under 1. below. Only students with a CGPA of at least 2.5 in the last four courses completed will be considered. Meeting the minimum requirement may not guarantee admission.

Major program: M08261 (7 full courses or their equivalent)
1. One 100-series course in ECO, HIS, PHI, PHL, POL, PSY, SOC
2. WDW 200Y, 220Y
3. Two full credits from: WDW 300H, 310H, 320H, 335H, 340H, 350Y, 360H, 365H, 370H, 375H, 380H, 400H, 420H, 450Y
4. Two full credits from: HIS 332H, 355H, 411H; PHL 270H, 271H, 370H; POL 470H; PSY 201H, 202H, 220H, 240H; SOC 200Y, 212Y, 213Y, 306Y; TRN 305Y; or additional courses from Group 3 above

EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS

Consult Mr. Damon Chevrier, Woodsworth College.

Enrolment in the specialist and major program is limited. Students must apply during the spring term of the year in which they complete their fourth full-credit course. Students must have completed ECO100Y/105Y and SOC101Y. Only students with a CGPA of at least 2.5 will be considered. Meeting the minimum requirement may not guarantee admission.

Specialist program (Hon.B.A.): S15351 (10.5 full courses or their equivalent including at least four courses at the 300+level)
1. ECO 100Y/105Y; SOC 101Y
2. ECO 244Y/WDW 244Y; HIS 313Y; MGT 460H; WDW 260Y, 430Y
3. ECO 239Y/339Y
4. ECO 220Y/PSY (201H and 202H)/SOC 200Y
5. ECO 321Y/323Y/HIS 262Y/263Y/POL 100Y/102Y/103Y
6. HIS 432Y/MGT (120H, 123H/223H)/SOC207Y/317Y/338Y/370Y/375Y

Major program (B.A.): M15351 (7.5 full courses or their equivalent including at least two at the 300+ level)
1. ECO 100Y/105Y; SOC 101Y
2. ECO 244Y/WDW 244Y; MGT 460H; WDW 260Y, 430Y
3. Two of ECO 239Y/339Y/HIS 313Y/432Y/MGT (120H, 123H/223H)/SOC 207Y/317Y/338Y/370Y/375Y

WOODSWORTH COLLEGE COURSES

(see Section 4 for Key to Course Descriptions)

For Distribution Requirement purposes, all WDW courses are classified as SOCIAL SCIENCE courses.

Criminology Courses

For all WDW Criminology courses, students must be enrolled in the Major Program in Criminology.

WDW200Y
Introduction to Criminology (formerly WDW203Y) 52L, 26T

The nature of crime and the Canadian system designed to control it. Introduction to major approaches to understanding crime and the development of criminal law, significant research on crime and the criminal justice system, laws and procedures related to crime and crime control in Canada. Not open to first year students.

Prerequisites: Four courses including one full credit in ECO/HIS/PHI/PHL/POL/PSY/SOC

WDW220Y
Introduction to Criminal Law and Procedure (formerly WDW212Y) 52L, 26T

An introduction to criminal law and the criminal process. The essential elements of criminal liability, including defences to criminal charges, the general characteristics of offences against the person, sexual offences, regulatory offences, and `victimless offences.' The criminal process, from investigation to sentencing, and the implications of the Charter of Rights for both substantive criminal law and criminal procedure.

Co- or prerequisite: WDW200Y

WDW300H
Theories in Criminology 39L

Major social and political theories of crime, law and justice, and their implications for policy development in the criminal justice system. An examination of the history and influence of various theoretical schools within Criminology.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW310H
Crime and Society in Canadian History 39L

Crime in the context of Canada's social, political and economic development from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Topics covered include: colonization and resistance, gender and sexuality, policing and punishment, and the development of criminal law.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW320H
The Prosecution Process (formerly WDW307Y) 39L

The historical evolution of the modern prosecution system. The exercise of discretion, and accountability for prosecutorial decision-making, recent adaptations and alternatives to the existing prosecution process, including current concepts of diversion, `reintegrative shaming' and `restorative justice.'
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW335H
Policing (formerly WDW308Y) 39L

A theoretical framework is developed to examine the nature of policing, its structure and function. Attention is given to the history of policing and to its public and private forms. An examination of the objectives and domain, as well as the strategies, powers, and authority of contemporary policing; including decision-making, wrong-doing, accountability, and the decentralization of policing.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW340H
Penology (formerly WDW306Y) 39L

The study of punishment from historical and philosophical perspectives, with a focus on contemporary Canadian policy issues. Topics covered include penal theory, prisons and non-carceral forms of punishment, and the goals of penal reform.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW350Y
Research Methods in Criminology 52L, 26T

An introduction to social science research methods used by criminologists. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of published criminological research is developed. Specific technical issues of sampling, measurement and statistics are taught in the context of examining alternative ways of answering research questions.
Exclusion: SOC200Y
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW360H
Law and Psychiatry (formerly WDW313Y) 39L

The increasing involvement of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals in the criminal justice system over the past 150 years, including contemporary Canadian practices. Emphasis is placed on understanding and evaluating competing interpretations of this phenomenon.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW365H
Crime and Mind (formerly WDW313Y) 39L

Legal, psychological and sociological understandings of issues in the criminal justice system, through a consideration of topics including: criminal intent, the insanity defence, the concept of `psychopathy', the use of `battered woman syndrome' as part of a self-defence defence, issues of transcultural psychiatry, and jury screening for bias.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW370H
Youth Justice (formerly WDW309Y) 39L

Administration of the youth justice system in Canada. The Young Offenders Act provides a legal framework for considering individual rights, the protection of society, and the welfare of young people. An analysis of legal principles and practices at various stages in the youth justice process. Policy issues and proposals for reform.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW375H
Young Offenders (formerly WDW309Y) 39L

Historical and contemporary definitions of illegal conduct by young persons. The nature and extent of youth crime, and an analysis of theories which attempt to explain it. Assessment of the effectiveness of treatment and other strategies for preventing and responding to youth crime.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW380H
Crime and Gender (formerly WDW314Y) 39L

Theoretical and policy discussions of the ways in which criminal law and the criminal justice system regulate gender and sexuality. Topics such as violence against women, abortion, prostitution, pornography and sexual orientation are considered, leading to an analysis of gender issues in modern states by feminist, legal and political theorists.
Prerequisite: WDW200Y, 220Y

WDW400H
Current Issues in Criminology 26S

An advanced seminar exploring in detail current issues in Criminology. Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to discuss current issues and their social, ethical and legal implications.
Prerequisite: Two 300-level WDW half-courses in Criminology

WDW420H
Current Issues in Criminal Law 26S

An advanced seminar exploring in detail current issues in criminal law. Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to discuss current policy and case law developments in the criminal law, and their social, political and ethical implications. The role of Parliament and the judiciary in the development of the criminal law is considered.
Prerequisite: Two 300-level WDW half-courses in Criminology

WDW450Y
Criminology Research Project TBA

An individual research project under the direction of a Criminology faculty member. Approval of the Undergraduate Secretary is required.
Prerequisite: WDW300H, 350Y

Employment Relations Courses

WDW244Y
Introduction to Employment Relations 52L

The economic, legal, political and social aspects of employment relations systems in the private and public sectors. An analysis of human resource and industrial relations issues, and the relationship between employers, employees and government within the Canadian labour market.
Exclusion: ECO244Y
Prerequisite: Four courses including one 100-series course in ECO/HIS/PHI/PHL/POL/PSY/SOC and a CGPA of at least 2.0

WDW260Y
Organizational Behaviour 52L, 13T

Introduction to nature of organizations and behaviour of people within organizations. Four topics are covered: a) Individuals in Organizations: motivation, stress, performance appraisal and rewards; b) Groups in Organizations: group processes, dynamics, leadership and conflict; c) Organization Structure and Design: bureaucracy, classical theories of management, contingency theories of design; d) Organizational Processes: communication, decision-making, organizational change. Not recommended for students in the Bachelor of Commerce program.
Exclusion: MGT362H, 363H, WDW103Y
Prerequisite: Four courses including one 100-series course in ECO/HIS/PHI/PHL/POL/PSY/SOC and a CGPA of at least 2.0

WDW430Y
Employment Law (formerly WDW330H, 430H) 52L

The major legal structures which regulate the employment relationship in the private and public sectors: the common law of contract (master/servant law), legislation governing collective bargaining, the primary statutes (employment standards act, human rights code, workers' compensation act, labour relations act, occupational health and safety act).
Prerequisite: ECO244Y/WDW 244Y, WDW260Y, enrolment in an Employment Relations program


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Revised: April 6, 1998

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